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With Interest

June 23, 2016 | By: Yuval Levin

Why have Jewish men and women succeeded in capitalist economies? How is it that Jews have come to be identified with both capitalism and with anti-capitalist movements like Bolshevism? Has capitalism been good to the Jews? Has it been good to Judaism? In a review of Jerry Muller’s Capitalism and the Jews, National Affairs editor Yuval […]

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Markets and Morals

June 7, 2016 | By: Jonathan Sacks

Friedrich Hayek, noted as one of the twentieth century’s greatest defenders of the free market, also made a case for religious traditions. In theory, the energetic, dynamic, disruptive market would seem to be at odds with the restraint, humility, and anti-materialism of revealed religion. Reflecting on Hayek’s praise for both religious order and market freedom, […]

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Markets, Morals, and Israel

December 8, 2014 | By: Samuel Gregg

Tikvah hosted an alumni event in Israel last month and invited the American economic thinker Samuel Gregg to speak. Gregg described the cultural foundations of economic order, and of national prosperity. Writing in Mida, Amnon Lord sees a similarity between these comments and Mitt Romney’s somehow-controversial praise for Israel’s start-up culture in 2012. But, as Lord […]

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This week, Christopher DeMuth is leading the advanced institute, “Capitalism and the Future of Democracy.” With his aid, we are focusing on the political economy of Joseph Schumpeter, Michael Novak, Irving Kristol, and Thomas Piketty, as well as looking at the political and economic options before, during, and after the 2008 financial crisis. The long-time […]

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Is there an authentically Jewish view of economics? Peter Berkowitz of the Hoover Institution argued during Tikvah’s advanced institute “Liberalism, Conservatism, and the Jews” that there is and there isn’t. As with medical care, there are technical dilemmas in economics that do not have an authentically Jewish solution, like the granular questions of monetary policy […]

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As part of Tikvah’s advanced institute “Liberalism, Conservatism, and the Jews”, Tikvah’s executive director Eric Cohen offered two philosophical dilemmas for conservatives. The first is how to reconcile the tension between an economics that praises creative destruction and a preference for cultural, political, and religious continuity. The second is the dilemma of conservatism’s metaphysical roots: […]

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To begin a close reading of one of Karl Marx’s most important early works, “On the Jewish Question”, Hoover Institution fellow Peter Berkowitz identified two kinds of emancipation Marx is concerned with. The first is political emancipation, or liberal democracy. But Marx sees that kind of freedom as insufficient; what is needed is “human emancipation.”

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The Gospels proclaim that it is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of heaven, meaning Christian doctrine holds that salvation is more difficult for the wealthy man. Judaism doesn’t seem to have the same antipathy toward wealth. But wealth is […]

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Is there an acceptable level of inequality for a society to maintain? This was one of the questions addressed by economist Douglas Holtz-Eakin during the course of Tikvah’s advanced institute on “The Israeli Economy: A Strategy for the Future.” As became apparent during the discussion, this a debate often mired in envy for the wealthy, […]

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The Case for Competition

July 17, 2014

American Enterprise Institute scholar James Pethokoukis argues that corporations—unlike citizens who might deserve a social safety net—must be spurred by the ever-present fear of failure. Without the possibility of failure, innovation, efficiency, and growth are impossible. In many ways, crony capitalism, government protection of incumbent businesses, and other anti-competitive policies have led to the recent […]

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