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MAIMONIDES SCHOLARS PROGRAM

Session #1: June 23–July 5 | Session #2: July 28–August 8
Check out the Tikvah Scholars page!

Western Civilization



What is the best life? What is virtue, and can it be taught? What is a just society? What makes something beautiful, or good?

The heart of the Tikvah experience happens at the seminar table—in rich, probing, and spirited discussions between students and teachers and among the students themselves. Each summer, our students choose seminars for the two weeks of study together in the fields of economics, politics, philosophy, and/or literature. The seminars focus on open-ended topics (and close readings of great texts) that lend themselves to varied opinions and spirited debate. A sampling of last year’s courses are included below:

Ethics and Economics
This course examines the moral and economic case for market economies by examining key texts that articulate moral and economic defenses of free market economies, including Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations, Michael Novak’s The Spirit of Democratic Capitalism, and Wilhelm Röpke’s A Humane Economy.

Religion in American Law
The goal of this course is to explore the evolution of these clashes between law and religion, evaluating how we might apply the constitutional principles of religious liberty and non-establishment to contemporary and divisive church-state dilemmas.

Justice and Political Drama
Through the lens of two plays with deep political implications, Sophocles’ Antigone and Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure, we will explore fundamental questions about the relationship between the individual and society.  On what foundation does political authority rest – and how can fallible human beings better endeavor to make justice manifest in a deeply flawed world?

Liberty and Equality: The American Ideals
The goal of this course is to explore the evolution of these clashes between law and religion, evaluating how we might apply the constitutional principles of religious liberty and non-establishment to contemporary and divisive church-state dilemmas.