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Thinking About Revelation

August 13, 2014

During Tikvah’s advanced institute “Liberalism, Conservatism, and the Jews,” Eric Cohen, Yuval Levin, and Meir Soloveichik tried to sort through the deep dilemma facing the modern, post-Enlightenment Jew who also holds a Burkean respect for old ways. Eric Cohen began by pointing out how peculiar the claims of historical revelation are, so peculiar as to strain […]

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Spinoza's Religion

August 7, 2014

For the advanced institute “The Jewish Idea of God”, founding CEO of the Ein Prat Academy Micah Goodman offered his interpretation of Spinoza. Goodman begins this clip by setting forth the proposition that humans are set apart by two qualities: we are the only animals aware that there is a future and we also know […]

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Drawing on Rabbi Akiva’s aphorism that “everything is foreseen but free will is given,” novelist Dara Horn eloquently describes the tension at the heart of Jewish family life. The tension in theology between what is given to fate and what to free will is mirrored in parenting by the tension between what is innate and what […]

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A Jewish Theory of Humor

July 29, 2014

In a discussion of Sholem Aleichem, Dara Horn elucidates two classic theories of humor. The first, from the literary critic Henri Bergson, states that we laugh when something “mechanical” is “encrusted on the living.” We laugh at others’ expense. The other theory, authored by Sigmund Freud, involves laughing at ourselves to release ourselves from a […]

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During Tikvah’s advanced institute on the “Jewish Idea of God”, Ein Prat Academy’s founding CEO Micah Goodman presented some of the challenges associated with Maimonides’s Aristotelian understanding of God. Perhaps most problematic is the question of whether this vision of a static and unchanging God is really compatible with the Bible’s depiction of a God […]

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Founding CEO of Ein Prat Academy Micah Goodman discusses the move from polytheism to monotheism as a revolutionary transition. This transition was much more than the simple exchange of a belief in many gods for a belief in One. The more radical and consequential break—pointing us to the very heart of the Jewish idea of […]

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During Tikvah’s advanced institute on “Liberalism, Conservatism, and the Jews”, Hoover Institution scholar Peter Berkowitz discussed Michael Walzer’s account of the Talmudic parable of the oven of Akhnai. Is the oven pure? The rabbis say it is, but Rabbi Eliezer dissents, first appealing to logic but then appealing to miracles. “If the law is as […]

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In God’s House

July 14, 2014

Does Judaism conceive of God as having a dwelling place here on earth? During the course of Tikvah’s advanced institute on “The Jewish Idea of God,” Micah Goodman, founding CEO of Ein Prat, explores a tension between the account of the tabernacle in Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers and the account of the tabernacle in Deuteronomy. […]

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In the popular imagination, Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel is remembered for his involvement in civil rights, the anti-Vietnam War movement, and the cause of Soviet Jewry. But, as Rabbi Shai Held demonstrates in his new book, Abraham Joshua Heschel: The Call of Transcendence, Rabbi Heschel was first and foremost a theologian and philosopher of religion. What are his core ideas, and what are his main religious insights? How did he develop his views of covenant and love, his fear of the unbounded ego, and his unique interpretation of human and divine agency? How can Rabbi Heschel’s thought inspire the Jewish community and challenge religious people everywhere to recapture the wonder that opens them up to God’s call?

Watch as Rabbi Dr. Shai Held, cofounder, dean, and chair in Jewish Thought at Mechon Hadar, discusses Heschel’s legacy and situates his work within contemporary Jewish theology and the philosophy of religion. The event was recorded before a live audience on February 25, 2014 at the Tikvah Center in New York City.

Watch the event here.

Nineteenth century political emancipation brought citizenship rights to European Jews. In How Judaism Became a Religion, Leora Batnitzky explores how this new political reality affected Jewish philosophy and the Jewish people. The prospect of secular citizenship challenged Judaism’s premodern integrity, and drove Jewish writers, intellectuals, and rabbis to grapple with how to recast Judaism as a “religion,” emphasizing its private faith over its national call to public practice. The transformation of Judaism as a religion – and reactions to it – is the driving question of modern Jewish thought to this day. What does Judaism gain and lose as a religion? What effects, positive and negative, has this modern transformation yielded? How does conceiving of Judaism as a religion relate to Zionism and the refounding of a Jewish State for the Jewish People?

Watch as Leora Batnitzky, Ronald O. Perelman Professor of Jewish Studies, Professor of Religion, and Chair of the Department of Religion at Princeton University, discusses the intellectuals who recast Judaism as a modern religion, those that opposed the change, and the legacy of modern Jewish thought today. The event was recorded before a live audience on February 20, 2014 at the Tikvah Center in New York City. For information on other upcoming Tikvah events, please check our Events page.

Watch the event here.